Why you crave certain foods (and why it’s OK)

February 21st, 2018 | no comments

Plus:

 

Last week you learned how to build your very own energizing and satisfying PeaceMeals, with plenty of Earthfoods, Healthy Protein, and Healthy Fat.

We’re up to the next Nourish Guideline, and I just know you are going to resonate with it. 

Nourish Guideline #5: Build imperfection into your day

“You mean I’m not supposed to be perfect at this whole healthy eating thing? I shouldn’t feel guilty when I crave potato chips? It’s OK to have food cravings? ”

No, no, and yes!

There is something unsettling about a diet full of only healthy food…sort of like, the body craves a little bit of fun every once in awhile. I consider myself to be a pretty healthy eater: tons of veggies and greens, plenty of Healthy Fats, like avocados, nuts and seeds, and probiotic-rich foods like fermented vegetables. Because I feed my body this way, it craves these foods most often (remember…what you feed your body most, it will crave!).

But…

At least a few times each week, my body also craves sweet and salt. This used to frustrate me to no end, because if my body is supposed to crave what I feed it most, and I feed it nourishing and healthy foods, why the hell do I crave chocolate and tortilla chips if I don’t regularly eat them?

Then I was introduced to the works of Dr. David Katz, director of Yale University’s Prevention Research Center. He states the following: “Our attraction to sweets and salt, carbohydrates and fat– is hard-wired from the Stone Age. Back then, food cravings were reliable signals to our ancestors to seek out certain foods that would provide energy (sugar, fat) and essential minerals (salt). Today, food is plentiful and it’s easy to avoid physical activity, but we’ve preserved craving tendencies because evolution is very slow”.

This helped me to remember that I am in fact human and even though I eat nutritious food 90% of the time, human beings are imperfect. Therefore, an expectation of 100% is completely ridiculous and unrealistic. So I decided to reframe the way I approach my cravings:

“Hello, my name is Melanie Jatsek and I crave sugar and salt from time to time, which therefore makes me a perfectly imperfect human being.”

Boy does that feel good! Talk about a total sense of inner freedom. I encourage you to give yourself permission to be a perfectly imperfect human being too. Shout it from the rooftops. Embrace it!

I often chuckle when I run into someone I know while grocery shopping. The encounter goes something like this: We exchange a warm, friendly greeting and then she proceeds to apologize for the contents of her grocery cart, blaming the box of cookies on her husband and children. After I assure her it’s OK, I then point to the chocolates in my cart. So, if I ever run into you at the store and you happened to have a food in your cart that you’re not proud of, instead of hiding it or explaining it away, stand proud and repeat my mantra:

“Hello, my name is ________________ and I crave __________ and ____________ from time to time, which therefore makes me a perfectly imperfect human being!”

Just remember, your body craves what you feed it most. So if you are eating healthy food 90% of the time, you will crave healthy food 90% of the time.

Mel’s weekly food pick:
Turmeric

Curcumin is the main active ingredient in turmeric and is responsible for its anti-inflammatory properties in the body.

Turmeric may offer protection against certain cancers, treat arthritis, benefit those with inflammatory bowel disease, reduce blood sugar, and help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. The effects of this spice can be seen in rural India, where less than 1 percent of seniors aged 65 and over have Alzheimer’s disease, compared to about 13 percent in the United States. Turmeric can also enhance neurogenesis (the birth of new brain cells) while fighting Alzheimer’s disease–causing plaques.

Because curcumin may also prevent oxidation of cholesterol, it offers hope for those with high cholesterol.

It has a warm, earthy, sweet, peppery flavor, and is a key ingredient in most Indian curries.

Tip: Combining turmeric with black pepper increases its bioavailability (absorption). You can add fresh turmeric to smoothies, casseroles and rice dishes or add turmeric powder to egg salad, pea soup, lentil or bean salad, or your favorite roasted vegetable dish. See this week’s recipe for Turmeric Roasted Vegetables!

Mel’s weekly recipe pick:
Turmeric Roasted Vegetables

I used to totally dislike Brussels sprouts …and then I was introduced to the wonderful world of roasting. Wow! What a game-changer. Roasting is a simple cooking method that really brings out the flavor of your favorite (and not-so-favorite-until-now) veggies. You can roast just about any vegetable– and for even more flavor– season with sea salt, pepper, and unsalted herbs and spices. My favorite seasonings for roasting are turmeric, cumin, cayenne pepper, thyme, and garlic.

Turmeric has a warm, earthy, sweet, peppery flavor, and is a key ingredient in most Indian curries.

Fill your dinner plate with a layer of Turmeric Roasted Vegetables and top with a piece of wild salmon, or mix into salad greens, dress with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar, and top with strips of tempeh for a truly unforgettable salad!   →→→

Print Recipe
Turmeric Roasted Vegetables
2 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 4 cups Brussels sprouts trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 large sweet potato unpeeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices and then quartered
  • 2 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced in half Cremini mushrooms are sometimes called "baby bella" mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp. cumin
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 4 cups Brussels sprouts trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 large sweet potato unpeeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices and then quartered
  • 2 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced in half Cremini mushrooms are sometimes called "baby bella" mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp. cumin
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash and trim all vegetables and add to a large bowl.
  2. Drizzle with olive oil and add salt, pepper, and spices. Using a large spoon, stir vegetables to evenly coated with oil and spices.
  3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes until tender. They should still have a slight crunch to them!
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Facts: Calories: 210Total Fat: 15 g; Saturated Fat: 2 g; Sodium: 330 mg; Potassium: 480 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 19 g; Dietary fiber: 6 g; Net Carbohydrates: 13 grams; Sugar: 6 g; Protein:5 g

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Turmeric Roasted Vegetables

February 21st, 2018 | no comments

I used to totally dislike Brussels sprouts …and then I was introduced to the wonderful world of roasting. Wow! What a game-changer. Roasting is a simple cooking method that really brings out the flavor of your favorite (and not-so-favorite-until-now) veggies. You can roast just about any vegetable– and for even more flavor– season with sea salt, pepper, and unsalted herbs and spices. My favorite seasonings for roasting are turmeric, cumin, cayenne pepper, thyme, and garlic.

Curcumin is the main active ingredient in turmeric and is responsible for its anti-inflammatory properties in the body. Turmeric may offer protection against certain cancers, treat arthritis, benefit those with inflammatory bowel disease, reduce blood sugar, and help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Because curcumin may also prevent
o
xidation of cholesterol, it offers hope for those with high cholesterol. Turmeric has a warm, earthy, sweet and peppery flavor and is a key ingredient in most Indian curries.

Fill your dinner plate with a layer of Turmeric Roasted Vegetables and top with a piece of wild salmon, or mix into salad greens, dress with extra virgin olive oil and balsamic vinegar, and top with strips of tempeh for a truly unforgettable salad!   →→→

Print Recipe
Turmeric Roasted Vegetables
2 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 4 cups Brussels sprouts trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 large sweet potato unpeeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices and then quartered
  • 2 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced in half Cremini mushrooms are sometimes called "baby bella" mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp. cumin
Course Side Dish
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 30-40 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 4 cups Brussels sprouts trimmed and cut in half
  • 1 large sweet potato unpeeled and cut into 1/2-inch slices and then quartered
  • 2 cups cremini mushrooms, sliced in half Cremini mushrooms are sometimes called "baby bella" mushrooms
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • Sea salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. ground pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp. ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp. cumin
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Wash and trim all vegetables and add to a large bowl.
  2. Drizzle with olive oil and add salt, pepper, and spices. Using a large spoon, stir vegetables to evenly coated with oil and spices.
  3. Spread in a single layer on baking sheet and bake for 30-40 minutes until tender. They should still have a slight crunch to them!
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Facts: Calories: 210Total Fat: 15 g; Saturated Fat: 2 g; Sodium: 330 mg; Potassium: 480 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 19 g; Dietary fiber: 6 g; Net Carbohydrates: 13 grams; Sugar: 6 g; Protein:5 g

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Three components of a balanced meal

February 14th, 2018 | no comments

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Last week I revealed ten Nourish Guidelines to help you plan your meals and snacks and touched upon the first two: the importance of eating three daily meals and when to add snacks (if at all).

Nourish Guideline #1: Eat breakfast, lunch and dinner every day.

Nourish Guideline #2: Only eat a snack if more than 4 to 5 hours pass between meals, or if you are physically hungry.

 

Today, in Nourish Guidelines #3 and #4, you will learn more about meal planning and how to build your very own energizing and satisfying PeaceMeals, with plenty of Earthfoods, Healthy Protein, and Healthy Fat.

Nourish Guideline #3: Add at least 3 Earthfoods to each of your meals to make a PeaceMeal

Earthfoods are the foods we all know we should be eating more of: single ingredient, unprocessed, health-empowering, nutrient-rich foods from the earth. Simply put, they are the foods your body was designed to eat and truly longs for. They are powerful beyond measure and include vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, avocados, legumes, herbs, spices, cacao, green tea and many others.

To learn more about Earthfoods, including portion sizes and how to form a PeaceMeal, click HERE.

Nourish Guideline #4: Balance your PeaceMeal with Healthy Fat and Healthy Protein

Healthy Fat:

In the eighth Universal Truth, you learned about the importance of healthy dietary fat on blood sugar regulation, satiety (feelings of fullness), and overall health.

Healthy Fat alone will not spike your blood sugar or insulin levels, therefore it stands to reason that Healthy Fat added to meals will slow the release of glucose in the blood and keep overall blood sugar levels more stable. For this reason, it is essential that you build one to three servings of Healthy Fat into each of your PeaceMeals.  

Sometimes you will add it in the cooking process, such as roasting Brussels sprouts in coconut oil, and other times you will be incorporating fats into your meal, like adding a tablespoon of fresh ground almond butter and a half of an avocado to your kale and blueberry smoothie. Without the fat, the smoothie would not be as satisfying.

Please note…

You do not necessarily have to add more fat to a meal when you eat foods naturally containing fat…unless it makes sense. For example, a breakfast of full-fat (4% milkfat) cottage cheese and berries contains plenty of fat in the cottage cheese, therefore you don’t have to add anymore (although, I like to sprinkle some raw sunflower seeds in mine for a little crunch!).

For a list of Healthy Fats, along with reasonable portion sizes, click HERE! Notice how several Healthy Fats, such as avocados, nuts, seeds, nut/seed butters, also double as an Earthfood!

Healthy Protein:

Adding one serving of high quality, Healthy Protein to each of your meals is also key for good health and blood sugar management. Healthy Proteins include:

  • Legumes: beans, peas, lentils: ½ cup cooked
  • Hummus: ¼ cup
  • Seafood: sardines, mackerel, herring, wild salmon, anchovies, tuna, and trout: 3-6 ounces
  • Organic, grass fed beef; organic free-range chicken, turkey, and lamb: 3-6 ounces
  • Cottage cheese (full fat): ½ cup
  • Plain Greek or Icelandic yogurt (full fat): ½ cup
  • Eggs-free range, organic: 1 egg
  • Plant-based or bone broth protein powder: ½-1 scoop
  • Tempeh (fermented soy): 3 ounces

Putting it all together: Simple Mediterranean Mason Jar Salad (see below for recipe)

This tasty and simple salad illustrates how easy it is to form a balanced meal. Due to the varied portion sizes of the ingredients, it contains approximately four Earthfoods, one Healthy Fat, and two Healthy Proteins.

  • Earthfoods: lentils, greens, blueberries, almonds, basil
  • Healthy Fat: almonds, olives
  • Healthy Protein: hummus, lentils

Next week….

I know I’ve been talking a lot about proper nutrition lately, and yet this feels like the perfect time to say what I’m about to say.

So here goes….

There is something unsettling about a diet full of only healthy food, sort of like the body craves a little bit of fun every once in awhile. Can you relate?

Before I move on to any more proper nutrition-related guidelines, in my next post I will show you how to build imperfection into your meal plan (and why it’s perfectly acceptable to do so!). You’re going to love this one!

 

Mel’s weekly food pick:
Lentils

Whenever someone challenges me with the “it’s too expensive to eat healthy” line, I immediately introduce them to the beloved bags of lonely lentils hanging out in the bean aisle of their grocery store.

Lentils are edible legumes, grown for their lens-shaped seeds. They have been part of the human diet since the Neolithic times and evidence shows they were eaten 13,000 to 9,500 years ago. They range in color from yellow to red-orange to green, brown and black

Not only are lentils high in antioxidants (inflammation-fighting substances), they are loaded with dietary fiber, iron, and protein– making them a perfect substitute for meat and oh so good for your blood sugar and cholesterol levels!

How to eat them:

Boil up an entire bag on Sunday (takes only 20 minutes and requires no soaking) and refrigerate in a sealed container. Add a couple of spoonfuls to salads, soups, tuna or egg salad, or omelets.

Mel’s weekly recipe pick:
Simple Mediterranean Mason Jar Salad

OK, I admit…this meal doesn’t look like it could satisfy a mouse, does it? But I have to tell you…it packs a serious punch, without making you feel stuffed. And since most of us want to be productive after lunch, this salad is the perfect solution. 

It gets its “staying power” from the protein and fiber-rich lentils and fat-rich hummus– which is made from chickpeas, olive oil, and tahini (ground sesame seeds).  

Looking for a little extra protein? Add a couple ounces of pulled rotisserie chicken, wild salmon, or tuna. A chopped hard-boiled egg would work too! 

You can easily prepare this salad ahead of time and store in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s lunch. Enjoy!

 

Print Recipe
Simple Mediterranean Mason Jar Salad
4 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥♥
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes (for lentils)
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp. hummus
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked
  • 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh berries
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 2 tbsp. sliced almonds
  • 5 kalamata olives
  • 2 tbsp. fresh basil, cut into ribbons
  • 2 tbsp. feta cheese or shredded Parmesan/Asiago cheese
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes (for lentils)
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp. hummus
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked
  • 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh berries
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 2 tbsp. sliced almonds
  • 5 kalamata olives
  • 2 tbsp. fresh basil, cut into ribbons
  • 2 tbsp. feta cheese or shredded Parmesan/Asiago cheese
Instructions
  1. Prepare one bag of lentils according to instructions. Drain and set aside to cool. Scoop out a 1/2 cup portion and mix with balsamic vinegar and salt/pepper to taste. Refrigerate leftover lentils in sealed container and add to your meals throughout the week.
  2. Layer a mason jar in the following order: hummus, prepared and seasoned lentils, berries, greens, almonds, olives, fresh basil, and cheese. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Facts: Calories: 400Total Fat: 21 g; Saturated Fat: 4 g; Sodium: 625 mg; Potassium: 132 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 37 g; Dietary Fiber: 13 g; Net Carbs: 24 g; Sugar: 8 g; Protein:18 g

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Get FREE tips and tiny slices of motivation to help you live a healthier life...without giving up chocolate!

Simple Mediterranean Mason Jar Salad

February 14th, 2018 | no comments

OK, I admit…this meal doesn’t look like it could satisfy a mouse, does it? But I have to tell you…it packs a serious punch, without making you feel stuffed. And since most of us want to be productive after lunch, this salad is the perfect solution. 

It gets its “staying power” from the protein and fiber-rich lentils and fat-rich hummus– which is made from chickpeas, olive oil, and tahini (ground sesame seeds).  

Looking for a little extra protein? Add a couple ounces of pulled rotisserie chicken, wild salmon, or tuna. A chopped hard-boiled egg would work too! 

You can easily prepare this salad ahead of time and store in the refrigerator for tomorrow’s lunch. Enjoy!

Print Recipe
Simple Mediterranean Mason Jar Salad
4 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥♥
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes (for lentils)
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp. hummus
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked
  • 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh berries
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 2 tbsp. sliced almonds
  • 5 kalamata olives
  • 2 tbsp. fresh basil, cut into ribbons
  • 2 tbsp. feta cheese or shredded Parmesan/Asiago cheese
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes (for lentils)
Servings
serving
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp. hummus
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked
  • 2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh berries
  • 2 cups mixed greens
  • 2 tbsp. sliced almonds
  • 5 kalamata olives
  • 2 tbsp. fresh basil, cut into ribbons
  • 2 tbsp. feta cheese or shredded Parmesan/Asiago cheese
Instructions
  1. Prepare one bag of lentils according to instructions. Drain and set aside to cool. Scoop out a 1/2 cup portion and mix with balsamic vinegar and salt/pepper to taste. Refrigerate leftover lentils in sealed container and add to your meals throughout the week.
  2. Layer a mason jar in the following order: hummus, prepared and seasoned lentils, berries, greens, almonds, olives, fresh basil, and cheese. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

Nutrition Facts: Calories: 400Total Fat: 21 g; Saturated Fat: 4 g; Sodium: 625 mg; Potassium: 132 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 37 g; Dietary Fiber: 13 g; Net Carbs: 24 g; Sugar: 8 g; Protein:18 g

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10 Health-Rocking Eating Guidelines

February 6th, 2018 | no comments

Plus:

  • Mel’s weekly food pick:
    Elemental Superfood Seed Bars
  • Mel’s weekly recipe pick:
    Earthfood Energy Bars

 

With the eight Universal Truths in mind (to learn about the eight Universal Truths, click HERE and scroll halfway down), I have created a list of 10 Nourish Guidelines for you to follow as you plan your meals and snacks.

Why no rigid “Eat-this-not-that” rules? (If you struggle with dieting, calorie-counting, and food in general…you need to read this)

I am not one to lay down a bunch of rules about avoiding certain foods. First, I understand human nature. We as humans, thrive on the ability to choose. And if I take that away from you, it will only fuel your fire of desire to eat the not-so-healthy stuff. Instead, I offer education on the foods that rock your health and those that rob you of it, and then let you decide. Just remember: what you eat, you crave. So if you want to begin craving healing foods, all you have to do is eat them, and do so consistently.

I trust you will do what is best for you. The final decision is ultimately yours.

The second reason I am against rigid rules is because I am a realist. We live in the real world, and there will be times when the not-so-healthy foods end up on our plate. The last thing I want you to do is beat yourself up over eating these foods. I see this happen all the time and it isn’t pretty! Instead, if and when you eat them, do so consciously and intentionally. Be fully aware that you are feeding your body foods that can potentially rob you of good health, if you eat too much. Just the act of being conscious of what you are eating can be enough to help you shift back towards your Earthfood-rich diet.

No harm done.

Do you see how much more peaceful this approach is?

One of the foods I adore is cheese. I love how it tastes with a glass of dry red wine, accompanied by olives, marcona almonds and some fresh berries. Is cheese an Earthfood? Don’t I wish! I know that eating cheese isn’t particularly good for my health, but I enjoy it in moderation: an ounce or so about five days a week. Even though it’s not a health-rocking Earthfood, I find a way to include it because it feeds my soul. I eat it without guilt, savoring every last bite, and then make sure the rest of my food is clean and nutrient-rich for the remainder of the day.

See how this works?

I have full confidence that after consistently practicing the Nourish Guidelines below (even if you only adopt a few of them!), you will love the way you look and feel so much, that you won’t want to return back to your old way of eating. And if you do, it won’t be for long!

Now, on to the 10 Nourish Guidelines:

  • Nourish Guideline #1: Eat breakfast, lunch and dinner every day. 
  • Nourish Guideline #2: Only eat a snack if more than 4 to 5 hours pass between meals, or if you are physically hungry. 
  • Nourish Guideline #3: Add at least 3 Earthfoods to each of your meals to make a PeaceMeal. 
  • Nourish Guideline #4: Balance your PeaceMeal with Healthy Fat and Healthy Protein.
  • Nourish Guideline #5: Build imperfection into your day.
  • Nourish Guideline #6: Remove all refined sugars, artificial sweeteners, and trans fats from your diet. 
  • Nourish Guideline #7: If you choose to eat grains or dairy, select upgraded versions and mind your portions.
  • Nourish Guideline #8: If you can’t pronounce it, don’t put it on your plate!
  • Nourish Guideline #9: Identify your “Danger Zones”
  • Nourish Guideline #10: Check in: Are you really hungry?

To learn more about the first two Nourish Guidelines, click HERE. 

Get ready–next week we will dive into Nourish Guidelines #3 and #4, where you will learn more about meal planning and how to build your very own energizing and satisfying PeaceMeals, with plenty of Healthy Protein and Healthy Fat.

Mel’s weekly food pick:
Elemental Superfood Seed Bars

The Elemental Superfood Seed Bars are my favorite nutrition bar on the market today.

Creator Nicole Anderson began making food at home years ago because of her daughter’s allergies to wheat, dairy and sugar. Being a mother of a child with autism, Nicole realized first-hand the effects that these foods would have on her daughter’s well being. She made it her mission to research nutrition and food and the impact it has on the body. After seeing dramatic changes in her daughter as a result of a clean diet, she became passionate about creating foods that everyone can enjoy and benefit from. 

The bars are made with organic, raw, and unprocessed ingredients, such as nuts, seeds, cacao butter, cacao nibs and spirulina. They are also gluten and dairy-free! My favorite is the Mulberry, Cacao + Spirulina Seedbar, followed by the Currant, Cacao + Hemp Seed Seedbar! If you adore chocolate, you will love the Dark Chocolate + Peanut Butter Seedbar. 🙂

If you would rather save money and make your own bars, check out my recipe for Earthfood Energy Bars below! Simple and delicious.

Mel’s weekly recipe pick:
Earthfood Energy Bars

Other than a select handful of bars (like the Elemental Superfood Seed Bars!), most of the so called “nutrition” bars on the market are nothing more than big fat sugar bombs disguised as health food. I find it to be much healthier (not to mention more cost-effective) to make my own. This recipe is as simple as it gets! With 3 Earthfood servings per bar, I found it most appropriate to call them Earthfood Energy Bars!

Point blank, these bars make me happy! Not because they are tasty and filling (which they ARE!)…but due to the addition of a secret ingredient used by the Inca warriors for endurance. The addition of maca powder places this bar in a league of its own. Maca–also know as Peruvian ginseng– is part of a group of plants called “adaptogens”, which means that it can help your body fight fatigue and cope with every day stress in a more peaceful way.

Earthfood Energy Bars are loaded with nuts and seeds…and then more nuts and seeds! Pure maple syrup is the sweetener…but don’t worry, it works out to be just a smidgen over one teaspoon per bar.

I just know you will fall in love with these bars. ♥

Print Recipe
Earthfood Energy Bars
A raw, no-bake bar full of good healthy fat and protein! The extra special ingredient is maca powder. Maca, a root vegetable native to Peru, is considered an adaptogen, which means that it helps the body adapt to stress. If you can't find maca powder or would rather leave it out, just replace it with two extra tablespoons of ground flaxseed! Earthfood Energy Bars store well in the freezer...so go ahead and double the batch! 3 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥
Course Bars
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup milled flaxseeds
  • 1/2 cup raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 tbsp. chia seeds
  • 2 tbsp. cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp. maca powder I like the Navitas brand
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup unrefined coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh ground almond butter
Course Bars
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup milled flaxseeds
  • 1/2 cup raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 tbsp. chia seeds
  • 2 tbsp. cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp. maca powder I like the Navitas brand
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup unrefined coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh ground almond butter
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, grind the almonds until coarse. Add to a bowl with the sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, pepitas, chia seeds, cacao nibs, maca powder, and salt.
  2. In a small bowl, combine maple syrup, coconut oil, and fresh ground almond butter. Mix until well combined and add it to the bowl with the dry ingredients.
  3. Tear a sheet of parchment paper slightly bigger than an 8X8 pan. Line an 8X8 pan with the paper and add the mixture, spreading evenly to cover the pan. Pack down tight with your hands, then place in refrigerator for one hour to set. Slice into squares and store in airtight container in the refrigerator.
Recipe Notes
Nutrition Facts: Calories: 195Total Fat: 15 g; Saturated Fat: 5 g; Sodium: 75 mg; Potassium: 160 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 12 g; Dietary fiber: 5 g; Sugar: 4 g; Protein:6 g
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Get FREE tips and tiny slices of motivation to help you live a healthier life...without giving up chocolate!

Earthfood Energy Bars

February 5th, 2018 | no comments

Other than a select handful of bars (like the Elemental Superfood Seed Bars!), most of the so called “nutrition” bars on the market are nothing more than big fat sugar bombs disguised as health food. I find it to be much healthier (not to mention more cost-effective) to make my own. This recipe is as simple as it gets! With five Earthfood servings per bar, I found it most appropriate to call them Earthfood Energy Bars!

Point blank, these bars make me happy! Not because they are tasty and filling (which they ARE!)…but due to the addition of a secret ingredient used by the Inca warriors for endurance. The addition of maca powder places this bar in a league of its own. Maca–also know as Peruvian ginseng– is part of a group of plants called “adaptogens”, which means that it can help your body fight fatigue and cope with every day stress in a more peaceful way.

Earthfood Energy Bars are loaded with nuts and seeds…and then more nuts and seeds! Pure maple syrup is the sweetener…but don’t worry, it works out to be just a smidgen over one teaspoon per bar.

I just know you will fall in love with these bars. ♥

Print Recipe
Earthfood Energy Bars
A raw, no-bake bar full of good healthy fat and protein! The extra special ingredient is maca powder. Maca, a root vegetable native to Peru, is considered an adaptogen, which means that it helps the body adapt to stress. If you can't find maca powder or would rather leave it out, just replace it with two extra tablespoons of ground flaxseed! Earthfood Energy Bars store well in the freezer...so go ahead and double the batch! 3 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥
Course Bars
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup milled flaxseeds
  • 1/2 cup raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 tbsp. chia seeds
  • 2 tbsp. cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp. maca powder I like the Navitas brand
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup unrefined coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh ground almond butter
Course Bars
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 1 cup raw almonds
  • 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup milled flaxseeds
  • 1/2 cup raw pepitas (pumpkin seeds)
  • 2 tbsp. chia seeds
  • 2 tbsp. cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp. maca powder I like the Navitas brand
  • 1/2 tsp. Sea salt
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup unrefined coconut oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh ground almond butter
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, grind the almonds until coarse. Add to a bowl with the sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, pepitas, chia seeds, cacao nibs, maca powder, and salt.
  2. In a small bowl, combine maple syrup, coconut oil, and fresh ground almond butter. Mix until well combined and add it to the bowl with the dry ingredients.
  3. Tear a sheet of parchment paper slightly bigger than an 8X8 pan. Line an 8X8 pan with the paper and add the mixture, spreading evenly to cover the pan. Pack down tight with your hands, then place in refrigerator for one hour to set. Slice into squares and store in airtight container in the refrigerator.
Recipe Notes
Nutrition Facts: Calories: 195Total Fat: 15 g; Saturated Fat: 5 g; Sodium: 75 mg; Potassium: 160 mg; Total Carbohydrate: 12 g; Dietary fiber: 5 g; Sugar: 4 g; Protein:6 g
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Want to burn fat? Eat MORE (not less) fat

January 31st, 2018 | no comments

Plus:

In my last post, I offered five real benefits of including more fiber in your diet. To enjoy healthy blood sugar, lower your cholesterol, and feed the good bacteria in your gut, get at least 25 grams of fiber each day. Check out the post to learn the 15 fiber-rich foods you can start eating today for real results!

Now let’s get down to the eighth and final Universal Truth: Dietary fat is essential.

DIETARY FAT

There was a time in my life when I avoided dietary fat like it was the Grim Reaper. Everything I ate was either fat-free or super low-fat. At the time, it was a common belief that dietary fat made you fat. That’s what all of the diet books led you to believe, and of course it was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Guide Pyramid, which at the time encouraged you to eat six to eleven servings of grains every day (YIKES!), while minimizing fat. Naturally, being a follower of “sound” (note the sarcasm) nutrition advice from both the government and my dietetics classes at the University, I followed the advice…but took it to the extreme.

Every piece of food that passed my lips had no more than one or two grams of fat inside. I paid no attention to sugar, preservatives or any other substance that was harmful to my health, only fat. Cookies, ice cream, candy, yogurt, breads, crackers, salad dressings, cakes, frostings and peanut butter (yes, peanut butter) were all either fat-free or very low-fat. Pretzels were a staple in my diet because they were naturally fat-free. My favorite afternoon snack was twenty mini pretzel sticks and diet Pepsi. I would eat this treasured dieter’s delight while sitting it my nutrition classes learning all about proper nutrition!

How’s that for irony?

There was a major unwelcome consequence of my fat-is-evil philosophy…I was ALWAYS hungry. And there is a very good reason for this– dietary fat is the one macronutrient that aids in feelings of satiety (fullness). And because I stayed away from it, I never felt full. And when I did manage to feel satisfied, it didn’t last very long.  

Unfortunately, these ridiculous rumors– “fat makes you fat” and “fat is bad for you” continue to persist in the United States. I have at least one conversation a week with a misinformed individual, who still believes eating fat will make them fat. Not so! Not only does dietary fat help you burn fat, it is essential for proper brain and hormone function, nutrient absorption, and blood sugar regulation.

Of course there are dietary fats you want to avoid, such as refined vegetable oils and trans fats. Refined vegetable oils are high in omega-6 fatty acids and can promote inflammation in your body. They include soybean, corn, safflower, sunflower and canola oils. Trans fats, as previously mentioned, contribute to inflammation in your body, increase your bad cholesterol (LDL), and decrease your good cholesterol (HDL).

So what fats should you be eating for better health? I recommend the following:

  • For salads, stews and low-temperature cooking: Extra virgin olive oil, avocado oil, macadamia oil, walnut oil, almond oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Avocado (1/2 to 1 avocado)
  • Grass-fed butter such as Kerrygold or Organic Valley (1 tablespoon)
  • Ghee, or clarified butter (1 tablespoon)
  • Extra-virgin coconut oil (1 tablespoon)
  • Nuts: Almonds, walnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, cashews, Brazil nuts, pistachios, hazelnuts (1-2 handfuls)
  • Seeds: Sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, chia seeds, sesame seeds (1 tablespoon to ¼ cup)
  • Nut and seed butters (1 tablespoon)
  • Olives (1/4 cup)
  • Fatty fish like sardines, mackerel, herring, wild salmon (4-6 ounces)
  • Tahini (sesame seed paste) (1 tablespoon)
  • MCT oil (1 tablespoon)

As a general rule, make sure you have at least one or two servings of healthy fat per meal (I typically eat at least three servings per meal). For example, if you eat a salad for lunch, you’ll want to add a nice piece of wild salmon, a handful of sunflower seeds and a generous drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Making a smoothie? Do me a favor. If you are using the powdered peanut butter PB2, in an effort to save calories and fat…please stop! This product contains three ingredients: roasted peanuts (of which the natural oils have been removed), sugar, and salt. If anything, the presence of sugar and lack of fat in PB2 will only make you more hungry. Go for the real thing– a tablespoon of fresh ground peanut or almond butter…where the only ingredient is nuts (and sometimes salt).

In summary, the eight Universal Truths that I believe apply to everyone:

Universal Truth #1: What you resist, persists.
Universal Truth #2: You control food; It doesn’t control you.
Universal Truth #3: What you feed your body most, it will crave.
Universal Truth #4: Some foods can heal you.
Universal Truth #5: Some foods can harm you
Universal Truth #6: Some foods are questionable (DairyGluten; Alcohol)
Universal Truth #7: Dietary fiber is key
Universal Truth #8: Dietary fat is essential

With the above Universal Truths in mind, I have created a list of Nourish Guidelines for you to follow as you plan your meals. In my next post you will learn the first of these guidelines—a very hotly-debated topic indeed: to snack or not to snack!

Mel’s weekly food pick:
Avocados

I used to avoid avocados because of their high fat and calorie content, but then I grew up and discovered that the

presence of dietary fat and fiber in whole Earthfoods (i.e avocados) actually helped me eat less! Now I eat them every day.

Avocados are mostly monounsaturated fat, a type of fat that protects your heart and brain! A member of the fruit family, avocados contains nearly 20 vitamins and minerals and 7 grams of fiber per half.

To seed an avocado, simply cut it lengthwise around the entire seed and rotate both halves to separate. To remove the seed, slide a spoon underneath and gently lift out. Scoop the avocado out of its shell using a spoon.

Here are some easy ways to start enjoying the heart-healthy, brain-loving benefits of avocados today:

  1. Can that chip dip and whip up a batch of homemade guacamole in less than 10 minutes!
  2. Mash up half of an avocado and use as a spread on sprouted toast or sweet potato slices. 
  3. To thicken up a smoothie, add half of a small avocado and blend. Try my Feel-Good Smoothie!
  4. Swap out your traditional mayonnaise for homemade Avocado Mayo (takes only 5 minutes to prepare!)
  5. Make a simple breakfast bowl using diced avocado and hard boiled eggs.
  6. In the mood for something sweet? Prepare a batch of my Chocolate Peanut Butter “Pudding”. The main ingredient is avocado. Shhhhh….don’t tell anyone!

Mel’s weekly recipe pick:

Chocolate Peanut Butter “Pudding”

The beauty of this recipe? It can be eaten as a sweet treat or wholesome breakfast! And guess what? It’s dairy-free. The sneaky ingredient is avocado- which lends a beautiful creamy texture…just like traditional pudding!

With five Earthfoods per serving, it offers healthy fat and fiber, (from the avocados, chia seeds and fresh ground peanut butter) and a rich, natural chocolate flavor from the raw cacao powder.

It’s naturally sweetened with a mere 1/4 cup of pure maple syrup and ripe banana. You can omit the chia seeds If you don’t care for the texture…but just remember, you’ll be missing out on the omega-3 fatty acids!

Want it a little sweeter? Add another tablespoon of pure maple syrup or raw honey. Don’t like banana? Leave it out!

Print Recipe
Chocolate Peanut Butter "Pudding"
This deliciously decadent Chocolate Peanut Butter "Pudding" is the perfect sweet treat OR nutritionally-balanced breakfast. The secret ingredient is avocado, which gives the pudding its thick and creamy texture. It offers healthy fat and fiber, (from the avocados, chia seeds and fresh ground peanut butter) and a rich, natural chocolate flavor from the raw cacao powder. 5 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥♥♥
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 2 small avocados, ripe, peeled and seeded
  • 1 large banana, ripe
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder Navitas brand
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk Or other unsweetened nut milk of your choice
  • 1/2 cup fresh ground peanut butter The only ingredient should be peanuts (salt is OK too)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, raw honey or coconut nectar
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. fresh ground peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. chopped peanuts
  • 1/2 large banana, sliced into thin coins
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 2 small avocados, ripe, peeled and seeded
  • 1 large banana, ripe
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder Navitas brand
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk Or other unsweetened nut milk of your choice
  • 1/2 cup fresh ground peanut butter The only ingredient should be peanuts (salt is OK too)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, raw honey or coconut nectar
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. fresh ground peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. chopped peanuts
  • 1/2 large banana, sliced into thin coins
Instructions
  1. To a food processor or blender, add avocados through chia seeds and process until smooth.
  2. Portion into dessert cups and top each with one tablespoon of peanut butter, one tablespoon of chopped peanuts and two banana coins.
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Chocolate Peanut Butter “Pudding”

January 28th, 2018 | no comments

The beauty of this recipe? It can be eaten as a sweet treat or wholesome breakfast! And guess what? It’s dairy-free. The sneaky ingredient is avocado- which lends a beautiful creamy texture…just like traditional pudding!

With five Earthfoods per serving, it offers healthy fat and fiber, (from the avocados, chia seeds and fresh ground peanut butter) and a rich, natural chocolate flavor from the raw cacao powder.

It’s naturally sweetened with a mere 1/4 cup of pure maple syrup and ripe banana. You can omit the chia seeds If you don’t care for the texture…but just remember, you’ll be missing out on the omega-3 fatty acids!

Want it a little sweeter? Add another tablespoon of pure maple syrup or raw honey. Don’t like banana? Leave it out!

Print Recipe
Chocolate Peanut Butter "Pudding"
This deliciously decadent Chocolate Peanut Butter "Pudding" is the perfect sweet treat OR nutritionally-balanced breakfast. The secret ingredient is avocado, which gives the pudding its thick and creamy texture. It offers healthy fat and fiber, (from the avocados, chia seeds and fresh ground peanut butter) and a rich, natural chocolate flavor from the raw cacao powder. 5 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥♥♥
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 2 small avocados, ripe, peeled and seeded
  • 1 large banana, ripe
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder Navitas brand
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk Or other unsweetened nut milk of your choice
  • 1/2 cup fresh ground peanut butter The only ingredient should be peanuts (salt is OK too)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, raw honey or coconut nectar
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. fresh ground peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. chopped peanuts
  • 1/2 large banana, sliced into thin coins
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
  • 2 small avocados, ripe, peeled and seeded
  • 1 large banana, ripe
  • 1/2 cup raw cacao powder Navitas brand
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk Or other unsweetened nut milk of your choice
  • 1/2 cup fresh ground peanut butter The only ingredient should be peanuts (salt is OK too)
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, raw honey or coconut nectar
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. fresh ground peanut butter
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp. chopped peanuts
  • 1/2 large banana, sliced into thin coins
Instructions
  1. To a food processor or blender, add avocados through chia seeds and process until smooth.
  2. Portion into dessert cups and top each with one tablespoon of peanut butter, one tablespoon of chopped peanuts and two banana coins.
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25 of these every day can support healthy blood sugar & cholesterol!

January 23rd, 2018 | no comments

Plus:

Last week I shared my views on alcohol and offered my 3-step plan for safely including it in your diet without negative side-effects, if you so desire. In this post, I’m moving on to Universal Truth #7: Dietary Fiber is Key.

DIETARY FIBER

Dietary fiber is found in plant-based foods (what I call Earthfoods) like fruits, vegetables, whole and unprocessed grains, beans, peas, lentils, nuts and seeds. Most Americans fall way short on fiber. This is due to a rise in the consumption of processed convenience foods void of nutrition, such as frozen meals, chips, cookies, white flour products (bread, pasta,etc.), boxed meals, canned foods and a dependence on take-out.

Why should you even care about getting more fiber? Check out the five benefits of eating more fiber and decide for yourself if it’s worth it:

  1. Fill up faster and eat less.
  2. Poop with ease! I ask you…who doesn’t feel like superhero after a ‘complete evacuation’???
  3. Feed the good bacteria in your intestines.
  4. Enjoy healthy blood sugar levels. Fiber (especially soluble fiber) slows the absorption of sugar and helps improve overall blood sugar levels.
  5. Help lower your cholesterol and blood pressure if either one is elevated.

To keep your body in tip-top shape and enjoy the benefits just mentioned, you’ll want to aim for a minimum of 25 grams of fiber each day—this includes both soluble and insoluble fiber. Sadly, the average American eats only a mere 15 grams a day (and that’s on a good day). Why not strive to be better than average?

Both types of fiber, have their own unique benefits:

Soluble Fiber:

  • Dissolves in water to form a gel-like material.
  • Can help lower cholesterol and blood sugar.
  • Found in: oats, peas, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley, psyllium husk, flaxseeds.

Insoluble Fiber:

  • Moves bulk through the intestines and keeps you regular
  • Found in: bran, beans, lentils, flaxseeds, whole grains

Another reason to love dietary fiber:

You can subtract dietary fiber from the total grams of carbohydrate to get “net carbohydrates.” This is the amount of carbohydrate actually digested, which can influence your blood sugar. For example: One Raw Rev Glo bar contains 17 grams of carbohydrate and 14 grams of fiber, giving it a net carbohydrate value of only 3 grams!

To help you reach the 25 gram target, here are fifteen foods you can put in your cart on your next grocery trip:

  1. Raw Rev Glo Bars: 10-14 grams per bar
  2. Bean-based pasta (Explore Cuisine or Banza): 8-12 grams per 2 oz. serving
  3. Acorn squash: 9 grams per 1 cup
  4. Raspberries and blackberries: 8 grams per cup
  5. Avocados: 7 grams per 1⁄2 medium
  6. Beans and lentils: 6-8 grams per 1/2 cup cooked
  7. Pear: 6 grams for one medium
  8. Brussels sprouts: 6 grams per one cup cooked
  9. Ezekiel bread: 6 grams for two slices
  10. Broccoli: 5 grams per 1 cup
  11. Steel cut oats: 5 grams per ¼ cup dry
  12. Apple with skin: 4 grams for 1 medium
  13. Chia seeds: 4 grams per tablespoon
  14. Walnuts: 2 grams per ¼ cup
  15. Ground flaxseed: 2 grams per tablespoon

A word of caution about fiber:

If you are a fiber rookie, it’s a good idea to pace yourself and gradually increase the amount of fiber you eat (in 5-gram increments) over several weeks to avoid bloating and gas. Also, too much fiber and not enough water can cause constipation and digestive problems, so be sure to drink extra water to keep things moving along. There’s nothing worse than a digestive “traffic jam!”

 

In my next post, I will cover the final Universal Truth: Dietary fat is essential.

Mel’s weekly food pick:
Gluten Free Steel Cut Oats

Why steel cut oats? I get asked this question a lot.

Steel cut oats are whole oats that have been chopped into two or three pieces with steel blades. Rolled oats are made by steaming the whole oats, rolling them, steaming again, and then toasting them. Because they are minimally processed, steel cut oats rank lower on the glycemic scale compared to rolled oats, meaning they have less of an impact on blood sugar.

Stove top, steel cut oats take anywhere from 20-40 minutes to prepare. But don’t let that deter you! I like to cook up a big batch (I add eggs to my oats in the last 10 minutes of cooking- see my recipe below for Protein-Packed Steel Cut Oatmeal!) and store in the refrigerator for the week. When it’s time to reheat, I add a little water to thin it out and pop in the microwave for a minute or so.

Whether rolled or steel cut, keep your portions relatively small (about a half cup cooked) and fill the remainder of your bowl with nuts, seeds, about a half cup of fruit (I like diced apples and pears with the skins on or berries), and top off with a few shakes of ground cinnamon.

Mel’s weekly recipe pick:
Protein-Packed Steel Cut Oatmeal

Oatmeal used to be a breakfast staple for me, but I noticed I would get hungry an hour or so afterwards. So I sprinkled a few nuts on top and the extra fat seemed to help sustain me a little while longer…but it still wasn’t enough. Then I tried stirring in some plant-based protein powder. The texture seemed off to me and I simply didn’t enjoy it.

Finally I hit the jackpot of just the right oatmeal ingredients to really make it stick to my ribs! And the magic ingredient? Eggs!

This recipe adds two eggs to the final 10 minutes of cook time, offering an extra four grams of protein per serving.

But don’t stop with the eggs! Adding 1/4 cup of nuts and a tablespoon of seeds really makes an impact on satiety and blood sugar control. I love to top mine off with a little cinnamon and a 1/2 cup of berries, or diced apple or pear with the skin on!

 

Print Recipe
Protein-Packed Steel Cut Oatmeal
When topped with 1/4 cup nuts, 1 tablespoon of seeds, and 1/2 cup of fruit, this recipe yields 3 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
1/2-cup cooked
Ingredients
  • 3 cups water
  • 3/4 cup Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Steel Cut Oats
  • 2 organic free-range eggs, whisked
  • 1 tbsp. Kerrygold butter
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
1/2-cup cooked
Ingredients
  • 3 cups water
  • 3/4 cup Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Steel Cut Oats
  • 2 organic free-range eggs, whisked
  • 1 tbsp. Kerrygold butter
Instructions
  1. Bring water to a boil and add oats. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook for 10-20 minutes (depending on how chewy you like your cereal).
  2. In the last 10 minutes of cooking time, add eggs and butter and stir until combined. Stir frequently until eggs are cooked through.
  3. Top with: 1/4 cup of nuts (walnuts, almonds, pecans or hazelnuts) + 1-2 tbsp. seeds (ground flax, chia, hemp, sunflower or pumpkin) + 1/2 cup fruit (berries or diced apple or pear with the skin on) + ground cinnamon.
Recipe Notes

Cooked steel cut oats can be stored in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. Add water to reach desired consistency and heat stove top or in the microwave for 60 seconds.

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Protein-Packed Steel Cut Oatmeal

January 20th, 2018 | no comments

 

Oatmeal used to be a breakfast staple for me, but I noticed I would get hungry an hour or so afterwards. So I sprinkled a few nuts on top and the extra fat seemed to help sustain me a little while longer…but it still wasn’t enough. Then I tried stirring in some plant-based protein powder. The texture seemed off to me and I simply didn’t enjoy it.

Finally I hit the jackpot of just the right oatmeal ingredients to really make it stick to my ribs! And the magic ingredient? Eggs!

This recipe adds two eggs to the final 10 minutes of cook time, offering an extra four grams of protein per serving.

But don’t stop with the eggs! Adding 1/4 cup of nuts and a tablespoon of seeds really makes an impact on satiety and blood sugar control. I love to top mine off with a little cinnamon and a 1/2 cup of berries, or diced apple or pear with the skin on!

 

Print Recipe
Protein-Packed Steel Cut Oatmeal
When topped with 1/4 cup nuts, 1 tablespoon of seeds, and 1/2 cup of fruit, this recipe yields 3 Earthfoods per serving: ♥♥♥
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
1/2-cup cooked
Ingredients
  • 3 cups water
  • 3/4 cup Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Steel Cut Oats
  • 2 organic free-range eggs, whisked
  • 1 tbsp. Kerrygold butter
Course Breakfast
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
1/2-cup cooked
Ingredients
  • 3 cups water
  • 3/4 cup Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Steel Cut Oats
  • 2 organic free-range eggs, whisked
  • 1 tbsp. Kerrygold butter
Instructions
  1. Bring water to a boil and add oats. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook for 10-20 minutes (depending on how chewy you like your cereal).
  2. In the last 10 minutes of cooking time, add eggs and butter and stir until combined. Stir frequently until eggs are cooked through.
  3. Top with: 1/4 cup of nuts (walnuts, almonds, pecans or hazelnuts) + 1-2 tbsp. seeds (ground flax, chia, hemp, sunflower or pumpkin) + 1/2 cup fruit (berries or diced apple or pear with the skin on) + ground cinnamon.
Recipe Notes

Cooked steel cut oats can be stored in the refrigerator for 4-5 days. Add water to reach desired consistency and heat stove top or in the microwave for 60 seconds.

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